Matt Basso

Matt Basso

Matt Basso, jointly appointed in History and Gender Studies at the University of Utah, received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota’s Program in American Studies in 2001, his MA in history from the University of Montana in 1996, and taught in various roles at both those universities as well as in the U.S. Army while serving in Germany during the Gulf War. He retired as a Captain in 1994.  He is the Director of the American West Center at the University of Utah where he has spearheaded several digital history initiatives, including the Utah American Indian Digital Archive and the Utah Indian Curriculum Project <www.utahindians.org>. His current book project focuses on World War II home front masculinity and will be published by the University of Chicago Press. The relationship between place and the instrumental wartime role of masculinity, whiteness, religion, and working class subjectivity, and the part played by cultural artifacts in the process of defining exclusionary (and inclusionary) social and political practices, forms the core of the study. He is also the coeditor of Across the Great Divide: Cultures of Manhood in the U.S. West (New York: Routledge, 2001) and is editing a lost Federal Writers’ Project Manuscript from the 1930s. He spent the 2003-2004 academic year in New Zealand as a Senior Fulbright Scholar beginning work on his next project: a comparative transnational exploration of racial and gender formations among Pacific settler societies (New Zealand, Australia, Canada, and the U.S.). He counts cheering on his beloved Houston Astros, New Zealand’s “Black Caps” Cricket side, riding his scooter, and skiing as critical to his mental health (though the latter hasn’t been too kind to left ACL)

Matt Basso, jointly appointed in History and Gender Studies at the University of Utah, received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota’s Program in American Studies in 2001, his MA in history from the University of Montana in 1996, and taught in various roles at both those universities as well as in the U.S. Army while serving in Germany during the Gulf War. He retired as a Captain in 1994.  He is the Director of the American West Center at the University of Utah where he has spearheaded several digital history initiatives, including the Utah American Indian Digital Archive and the Utah Indian Curriculum Project <www.utahindians.org>. His current book project focuses on World War II home front masculinity and will be published by the University of Chicago Press. The relationship between place and the instrumental wartime role of masculinity, whiteness, religion, and working class subjectivity, and the part played by cultural artifacts in the process of defining exclusionary (and inclusionary) social and political practices, forms the core of the study. He is also the coeditor of Across the Great Divide: Cultures of Manhood in the U.S. West (New York: Routledge, 2001) and is editing a lost Federal Writers’ Project Manuscript from the 1930s. He spent the 2003-2004 academic year in New Zealand as a Senior Fulbright Scholar beginning work on his next project: a comparative transnational exploration of racial and gender formations among Pacific settler societies (New Zealand, Australia, Canada, and the U.S.). He counts cheering on his beloved Houston Astros, New Zealand’s “Black Caps” Cricket side, riding his scooter, and skiing as critical to his mental health (though the latter hasn’t been too kind to left ACL).